Terry Briscoe

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Theresa “Terry” Briscoe represents employers in all aspects of traditional labor relations and employment law. Drawing on her experience as the Human Resources Director and Director of Administrative Services for a mid-sized Washington city, Terry offers clients creative solutions to managing workplace legal issues. With 22 years of experience in public and private sector labor relations, Terry regularly counsels clients on matters involving collective bargaining, unfair labor practice charges, grievances, and union organizing drives. She also defends employers in employment litigation and proceedings before state and federal courts and administrative agencies.

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Northwestern University Football Players Can’t Vote for Union Representation …but it’s not over until it’s over…

Depending on your allegiance, “the Play” was one of either the most memorable or the most infamous moments in the history of college football. It happened in the final seconds of 1982’s annual “Big Game” between the Stanford Cardinal and U.C. Berkeley’s Golden Bears. As the fourth quarter was winding down, the Bears had taken … Continue Reading

NLRB Says “Mere Maintenance” of Employee Handbook Rules May Violate the NLRA

In recent years the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) has aggressively sought to emphasize that its reach extends beyond solely unionized workforces.  On March 18, 2015, NLRB General Counsel Richard Griffin released a 30-page report that provides labor lawyers and HR professionals guidance on what the General Counsel contends is – and is not – … Continue Reading

NLRB Final Rule: “Quickie” Elections are Now Reality

As anticipated, on December 12, 2014 the NLRB announced that the final “Quickie” Election Rule will be published in the Federal Register on December 15, 2014 and will take effect on April 14, 2015. Among other changes, the rule will shorten the time between the filing of a petition and the election for union representation … Continue Reading

NLRB Reverses Sodexo Off Duty Access Decision – a Crack in the Door After Noel Canning…Or Not?

Employers often maintain policies prohibiting off-duty employees from accessing their facilities.  The NLRB has maintained its “Tri-County Medical” rule for nearly 40 years:  an employer’s rule barring off-duty employee access to a facility is valid only if it (1) limits access solely to the interior of the facility, (2) is clearly disseminated to all employees, … Continue Reading

Facebook “Like” Button – Protected Activity? It Depends on What You “Like”!

In an ever expanding arc of decisions that extends the NLRA’s protections to a wide range of employee conduct – both on-and off-duty, and in union and non-union settings alike – the NLRB last week decided that merely clicking on Facebook’s “Like” Button was concerted, protected activity. Triple Play Sports Bar, 361 NLRB No. 31 (August 22, … Continue Reading

College Football Players Are Employees? Who’s Next?

The NLRB’s Regional Director in Chicago issued a decision on March 26 in 13-RC-121359 finding the football players at Northwestern University are employees under the NLRA, over the objections of the University. The Regional Director rejected the University’s arguments that the players, who receive “grant-in-aid scholarships” from the University, are more akin to graduate students, held … Continue Reading

NLRB Re-Issues Controversial “Quickie” Union Election Rule

On February 5, 2014, the National Labor Relations Board ("NLRB") re-issued its controversial “quickie” election rule.  As you may recall, that rule, which was opposed by employer groups, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and others, was invalidated by the D.C. District Court in May 2012.  The reissued "quickie" election rule would substantially shorten the time between the filing of a petition … Continue Reading

NLRB Effectively Scraps Plans (For Now) To Pursue Notice Posting Rule By Deciding Not To Seek Review By U.S. Supreme Court

The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) has suffered a series of setbacks recently at the hands of federal judges.  In December, the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals largely struck down the NLRB’s prohibition on class action waivers in arbitration agreements.  Now, on January 6, 2014, the NLRB announced that it won’t seek Supreme Court review of two U.S. Court of … Continue Reading
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