Tag: family and medical leave act

BOLI Seeking Comments on Changes to Family Leave Regulations

The Oregon Bureau of Labor and Industries (BOLI) will hold three public forums on possible regulatory changes to the Oregon Family Leave Act (OFLA) to better align it with the recently revised federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA).  BOLI is also seeking public comments through its regular comment process.  After receiving and reviewing the … Continue Reading

Oregon BOLI: No Changes to OFLA Regulations (yet…)

As previously reported here at the Stoel Rives World of Employment, new federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) regulations went into effect on January 16, 2009.  Oregon has its own analog to FMLA, the Oregon Family Leave Act (OFLA), with its own regulations.  FMLA applies to employers with 50 or more employees, while OFLA … Continue Reading

Reminder: New FMLA and Military Leave Regulations Take Effect Today

In case you haven’t heard, new Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) regulations take effect today, Friday, January 16. Some highlights of the new regulations include: Regulations covering the recently instituted military family leave laws Expanded FMLA general notification requirements New individual eligibility notification and leave designation requirements New forms for eligibility notification, leave designation, … Continue Reading

New FMLA Forms and Poster Now Available For Download

As previously reported in the Stoel Rives World of Employment, new Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) regulations will take effect January 16, 2009.  The DOL has now published six new optional forms contemplated by the new regulations, and as promised, the Stoel Rives World of Employment has them for you right here (just click on … Continue Reading

DOL Issues Final FMLA Regulations

Today the Department of Labor published its Final Regulations Implementing the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA). They go into effect on January 16, 2009 (60 days after publication).  Click here to download the final FMLA regulations.   (Warning!  The document is 762 pages long!  However, much of that is a handy explanation of the changes and the comments the DOL received.) … Continue Reading
LexBlog